C++: Ackermann Function

Bjarne-stroustrup
 

The Ackermann function is a classic example of a recursive function, notable especially because it is not a primitive recursive function. It grows very quickly in value, as does the size of its call tree.

The Ackermann function is usually defined as follows:

 A(m, n) = \begin{cases} n+1 & \mbox{if } m = 0 \\ A(m-1, 1) & \mbox{if } m > 0 \mbox{ and } n = 0 \\ A(m-1, A(m, n-1)) & \mbox{if } m > 0 \mbox{ and } n > 0. \end{cases}

Its arguments are never negative and it always terminates. Write a function which returns the value of A(m,n). Arbitrary precision is preferred (since the function grows so quickly), but not required.

#include <iostream>

unsigned int ackermann(unsigned int m, unsigned int n) {
	if (m == 0) {
		return n + 1;
	}
	if (n == 0) {
		return ackermann(m - 1, 1);
	}
	return ackermann(m - 1, ackermann(m, n - 1));
}

int main() {
	for (unsigned int m = 0; m < 4; ++m) {
		for (unsigned int n = 0; n < 10; ++n) {
			std::cout << "A(" << m << ", " << n << ") = " << ackermann(m, n) << "\n";
		}
	}
}

SOURCE

Content is available under GNU Free Documentation License 1.2.

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